Get issues you care about ready for Global Sprint Weekend

Submitted by YesCT on Thu, 01/21/2016 - 11:06

Introduction

Drupal Global Sprint Weekend is January 30 and 31, 2016, and so far we have 34 locations all over the world.

This post will talk about what organizers and experienced contributors can do to get issues ready for sprint attendees to work on.

There is still time to add your small local sprint. Read the post and get your location listed!

Preparation

Triage

Get an overview of your issue queue.

Review any RTBC issues, test (and if you are a maintainer, commit) them. Or, mark them needs work, giving specific actionable feedback. This will encourage past contributors to return, because they will see their work get in, or your review will show them you appreciate their work, and the specific feedback will help them know what to do next.

Reduce the size of your issue queue. Close issues won't fix, explaining why.

Postpone issues. Update the summary of issues to include information about what the issue is postponed on. Maybe whether it can be worked on or not depends on the phase of the release cycle the project is in. (Read the Core groups.drupal.org group for announcements about core release phases.)

Or, if it is blocked on another issue, postpone it and link to the blocking issue. (Update the blocking issue summary also noting the issues that are postponed on it.) Under the "Issue summary & relationships" field, make sure the issues are "related".

Eliminating issues you don't want people to work on will help them focus on the issues that are relevant. They will appreciate that.

Pick a few issues

Pick a few issues you want people to work on. Try to pick ones that involve a variety of skill sets and experience levels. List them in a way that is convenient for you. You could tag them SprintWeekend2016, and then use an advanced search to show just those issues. Or, make a google spreadsheet, or whatever works for you. If you have a couple issues that have very clear next steps documented and a small scope, tag them Novice. Read about what makes a good novice task.

For those issues, update the issue summary. Include a "Remaining Tasks" section which links to instructions for how to do each task. The dreditor browser plug in adds an "insert tasks" button to drupal.org issue pages that puts an html table with links to tasks in an issue summary. Uncomment or comment out rows in the table depending on what remains to be done on your issue.

Give constructive feedback

Read the drupal.org handbook page on constructive feedback. Whenever you leave feedback, thank the person for something specific that you would like them to do again. When making suggestions, give or link to examples. List specific next steps, give instructions or link to specifics, for example, link to one of the contributor tasks child pages.

Make a short list

Make a link to issues you want people to focus on. You might do this by using the drupal.org advanced search for issues, filtering to: your project, SprintWeekend2016 tag, and issues where the status is: needs work and needs review (and maybe also active). Make a second link to an advanced search that also filters to issues tagged novice. (Or, filter to whatever criteria you want.) Share these links with others.

Write a post

Write a post about the topic you want to sprint on. Give some background information. Celebrate what already works. Link to a few of the issues you want to tackle at the sprint. Edit the Global Sprint Weekend wiki and put a link to your post next to your location. Or, if you will be remote only, list it under virtual.

Have questions?

Tweet using the #SprintWeekend hash tag, post a comment on the g.d.o wiki page, ask in the Mentoring Group, or ask in IRC in #drupal-contribute. -Cathy (YesCT)

Resources for Organizers